Continuing The Fight: How learning to play guitar combats Alzheimer’s

Acoustic guitar with notes

A couple weeks ago I posted about a program in New York which is dedicated to providing iPods to Alzheimer’s patients. It has been shown in study after study that music can improve cognitive function and elevate mood providing temporary relief for those suffering from the devastating disease. It has also been shown, however, that music, specifically learning how to play an instrument such as the guitar, can help to fight off the onset of Alzheimer’s altogether.

In an article posted on Aging Home Healthcare’s website, the author cites a study conducted at the University of New South Wales in Australia which claims that vigorous and regular brain stimulation may reduce the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s by 50%. It has also been proven that regular mental stimulus and brain fitness exercises such as solving crossword puzzles, undertaking artistic endeavors, or learning how to play guitar can promote brain plasticity well into ones 80’s and 90’s.

Chinese-Scientists-Translate-Brain-Waves-into-Music

Learning how to play the guitar is a great way to stimulate the brain, but lessons are often expensive, frustrating, and inconvenient, eating into ones already precious time. With the Play a Tab program, however, all of these factors are negated. Inexpensive (under $7 per month), easy to follow, and convenient, Play a Tab makes it possible for beginners of any age to learn how to play the guitar at their own pace and at anytime.

While we are exceptionally proud to offer such a program that will be partially responsible for bringing up the next generation of musicians, we are equally thrilled and humbled to know that the same program can help combat the awful realities of dementia and Alzheimer’s.

If you want to learn more about Alzheimer’s Disease and how you can contribute to the ongoing fight to find a cure, visit the Alzheimer’s Association website at alz.org.

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